How To Restore Your Leaky Gut Syndrome In 5 Easy Steps And Restore Your Energy Level

WELLBEING-http-::www.lifestyle.com.au:health:top-tips-for-looking-good-and-feeling-great.aspx

The Art of Feeling Great

Now, a same promise by many health experts is that: You can make yourself FEEL and look as though time was running backwards. Truth will be revealed by eminent health experts and their word-by-word statement below on: How, with the proper scientific instruction, you can literally FEEL and look 10 to 20 years younger than your REAL AGE… erase wrinkles, blemishes and skin coarseness as the major side effects of following their methods… and do it using nothing more than such simple way as restoring your gut health.

This is, quite frankly, a vital message to people like you, whom always:

  • traveling across different time zones
  • work nearly half of the month in the sky
  • constantly beating against jet lag
  • constantly battling against constant bloating, constipation
  • experiencing chronic fatigue, low energy, lethargic, and sleepiness most of the time; 
  • always get sick easily, frequently
  • having skin condition not as imagine
  • NOT feeling great or depressed most of the time, etc

 

These are the signs & symptoms of you having a leaky gutAnd as a matter of fact, people have only recently bring back very ancient knowledge and ability to really do something about their gut health which is strongly related to your aging process, health status mentally & physically, and hence your daily performance…

 

 

exhauted FA https-::www.pinterest.com:shanynleake:life-as-a-flight-attendant:.jpg

 

Best 5 Strategies To Heal Your Leaky Gut Syndrome

Strategy #1

Ensure you receive the proper exposure to beneficial bacteria. Besides, from history perspective, clearly, humans evolved in a bacteria-rich environment. The food we ate, the ground upon which we slept, and even the water we drank sent a steady stream of microbial diversity into our bodies – and this went on for hundreds of thousands of years. It made for occasionally lethal infections, but it also made possible the digestion of a wide variety of foods, an ability that we continue to enjoy today.

People have been eating bacteria ridden foods for hundreds of thousands of years. One of the evidence is that our ancestral/ early hunters did employ unconventional meat storage method that probably presaged fermentation) and was consuming plenty of bacteria on a regular basis in this case. In most post-agricultural peoples, some form of fermented food is a standardized component of the traditional diet too, according to Mark Sisson, a former elite endurance athlete who has made health and fitness his life’s work.

Intestinal flora helps determine the quality of your mucosal immune system in several ways. Chronic, systemic inflammation stemming from disrupted gut flora as the root of most, if not all, diseases. So, by compromising your gut flora populations can allow harmful yeasts and bacteria to flourish, according to Dr. Art Ayer, PhD in Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology (U. Colo. Boulder)

 

hand wishing myth_http_::www.huffingtonpost.com:dr-mercola:hand-washing-dangers_b_861614.html

Proper Hand Washing Technique

 

But how to restore? By NOT overtly worrying about germs on your body till you keep using the rinse-free hand wash frequently or keep washing your hands that often! Hence, the great way to restore your body healthy microbiome is that you do not need to wash your hands very often! I mean… seriously. What? But why?

Well, yes, you are allowed to not wash your hands very often. Because you need to know how to expose to bacteria to stimulate your body immune system, you constantly need the stimulation. But it is recommended that you fixed your body with the right energy-generating, anti-inflammatory food and diet plan for your gut microbiome first then only move into these area of not washing your hands that often!

It is recommended that you fixed your body with the right energy-generating, anti-inflammatory food and diet plan for your gut biome first before moving into an area of not washing your hands that often.

Still not being convinced? Try to notice the people around you or you just be in the pharmacy for one day… you will noticed that nowadays people who have lots of skin problems is because they wash too much! Working as a pharmacist for 8 years, I’ve even seen extreme people buying big bottles of disinfectant dry hand wash in the pharmacy and also people whom looking for steroid treatment medication for their hand palm…

 

bad triclosan_http_::articles.mercola.com:sites:articles:archive:2014:12:03:triclosan-antibacterial-soap.aspx.png

The Health Dangers of Antibacterial Soap in Personal Care

 

In fact, you need your skin to have these resistant bacteria on it to protect you by creating certain anti-microbial benefits and oils that when you wash those off, you get the redness, the eczema, the dermatitis, etc. Some of those things are the direct reflection of being too clean and washing too much!

And also stop using conventional soaps, perfumes and all those things too much or too often! Because at the end of the day, you might wash away all those bacteria on your hands. Choose to made or buy one organic deodorant like this one, if you really needed to. It is those bacteria that help kill all the moulds in your skin. Let the bacteria do what they supposed to do.

Here is WHY you should STOP using natural deodorant to prevent you from Alzheimer Diseases.

 

sugar bad bugs_http_::drhyman.com:blog:2010:09:27:5-steps-to-kill-hidden-bad-bugs-in-your-gut-that-make-you-sick:.png

Strategy #2

Avoidance of sugar. If you CHOOSE to eat that sugar, you CHOOSE to feed the bad gut bacteria so it stops making poison, toxins like lipopolysaccharides (LPS) in your body, so then you feel better and you become a hostage. More like they’re in the cockpit with a gun to your head and you are not feeding what your body cells or good bacteria need. That’s why you shouldn’t trust those little bastards living in your gut most of the time now when you are experiencing those leaky gut syndrome. You need to vet them. You need to know who they are, what they are and what their intentions are and you need to set up the environment so they have no choice but to serve you. Otherwise they’ll take over. Like they’re mean little hackers. They hack your brain to feed them instead of your body. Hence, STOP eating sugar/ too much carbs = stop response to bad bacteria and stop become the hostages of your own bad bacteria in your gut and restore your energy level, according to one of the interview from world top health expert Dave Asprey with Summer Bock.

 

 

Strategy #3

The easiest way to reseed or re-introduce back the beneficial bacteria in your second braingut? NOT taking 1-2 probiotic capsules everyday. Yes, even though it claims to have 100 billion microbes in it. YET, eating fermented foods provides you 10 TRILLION good gut microbes! 

Hence, the easier, better, faster and economical way to increase good gut biome in your body? Is thru eating or drinking ancient fermented foods or cultured dairy products. Such as kombucha, kimchi, sauerkraut, miso, umeboshi, original pickles, yoghurt, kefir (if you have lactose intolerance, then forget about the yoghurt and consume kefir!). They are NATURAL PROBIOTICS.

 

 

 

Why? Therefore 2-3 ounces of non-pasteurized traditionally fermented vegetables is far far more beneficial than a whole bottle of probiotics! And fermented foods optimise your gut flora. These bacteria are making a lot of good things. Fermented foods are so beneficial because they contain lactic acid bacteria as well as a wide variety of other beneficial bacteria. Also, if fermented with a probiotics starter culture, the amount of healthy bacteria in a serving of fermented vegetables can far exceed the amount you’ll find in commercial probiotics supplements, making it a very cost effective alternative. Ideally, you want to eat a variety of fermented foods to maximize the types of bacteria you’re consuming, according to one of the World Top Health Expert Dr. Joseph Mercola, an osteopathic physician who are passionate in transforming the traditional medical paradigm in the United States.

BUT Sadly, with the advances in technology and food preparation, these time-honored traditional foods have been largely lost in our society. Hence, AVOID these kind of artificial food and choose the real food by making own fermented food. It is easy, cheap and healthy.

 

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-DO YOU KNOW ABOUT FERMENTED FOODS?-

What is Fermented Foods?

Fermented foods are foods that have been through a process of lacto-fermentation in which natural bacteria feed on the sugar and starch in the food creating lactic acid. This process preserves the food, and creates beneficial enzymes, B-vitamins, Omega-3 fatty acids, and various strains of probiotics as mentioned earlier. Natural fermentation of foods has also been shown to preserve nutrients in food and break the food down to a more digestible form. This, along with the bevy of probiotics created during the fermentation process, could explain the link between consumption of fermented foods and improved digestion. Fermentation can also render previously inedible or even dangerous foods become edible and nutritious. For example, the lectins, gluten, and phytates in grains can be greatly reduced by fermentation.

In fact, cultures around the world have been eating fermented foods for years, according to Mark Sisson, former elite endurance athlete who has made health and fitness my life’s work. 

  • The earliest sign of wine (fermented grapes) dates from about 8000 years ago, in Georgia (Caucasus, not the state north of Florida), and there’s evidence that people were fermenting drinks in Babylon circa 5000 BC, Egypt circa 3150 BC, Mexico circa 2000 BC, and Sudan circa 1500 BC.
  • Fermented, leavened bread was produced in Ancient Egypt, and milk was fermented in early Babylon as well.
  • Roman soldiers often subsisted on long-fermented sourdough bread, which survived long treks well (imagine conquering the known world on a diet of bread – fermentation must be pretty effective stuff).
  • The Inuit traditionally wrap whole seabird carcasses in seal pelts and bury them underground to ferment for months; rotting fish is another feature of their traditional diet.
  • Fermented dairy is a major aspect of the traditional Masai diet, as is clotted steer’s blood.
  • The list goes on and on: East and Southeast Asia with natto (fermented soy), kimchi (fermented cabbage), soy sauce, fermented fish sauce, fermented shrimp paste, to name just a few;
  • Central Asia with kumis (fermented mare milk), kefir, and shubat (fermented camel milk);
  • India and the Middle East with fermented pickles, various yogurts, torshi (mixed vegetables);
  • Europe with sauerkraut, kefir, crème fraiche, and rakfisk (salted, fermented trout); standard pickling, and chocolate;
  • The Pacific region with poi (fermented, mashed taro root) and something called kanga pirau, or rotten corn.
  • And also the famous energy-generating, anti-inflammatory food now is, the Kombucha, which is a culture of symbiotic beneficial bacteria and yeasts which originated in China nearly 2,000 years ago!

Thus there’s gotta be something to it, right? Since everyone’s doing it (or, at the very least, everyone used to do it)! Perhaps we should, too. Our standard healthy food pyramid is definitely missing fermented food! These foods should be included because they protect us from diseases as discuss in next chapter.

 

Photo Credit: (Left) Kefir – Chris Kresser, (Right) Dark Chocolate -Joshua Weissman 

 

Strategy #4

Once you increase your good healthy gut microbiome, you have to maintain the bacteria colony thru building up the terrain via providing a “comfortable home and provide food” (prebiotics) they needed to not just survive but to thrive. And see how your energy levels soars and life changes! Below are a few good prebiotics that will affect your gut bacteria colony:

  • Food that contain polyphenols found in blueberries, green tea, and other fruits and vegetables. The phenolic compound and our gut bacteria consume the glycan bonds holding the polyphenols together and render them available for better absorption. The glycans are prebiotics for the bacteria. And the liberated phenols are more bioavailable to us.
  • Dark chocolate, a combination of gut supportive polyphenols and prebiotic fiber! Great stuff. Click here for dark chocolate recipes, like Flourless Probiotic Chocolate Cookies, Guilt-Free Chocolate Cheesecake, Irresistable Chocolate Avocado Mousse.
  • Pistachios are another special package of fiber and polyphenols with potent prebiotic power. It beat other nuts in head-to-head match up because it is able to produce a biome richer in butyrate-secreting bacteria.
  • Resistant starch, that we cannot digest, travels through the digestive tract into the colon where the colonic bacteria is, who can help digest the stuff for us and reproduce. RS is not a fermentable fiber but it acts like it. Multiple studies indicate that RS consumption generally leads to an increase in beneficial colonic bacteria and a reduction in pathogenic colonic bacteria, including a boost to bifidobacteria (good bacteria) and a decrease in firmicutes (bad pathogenic bacteria).

 

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-DO YOU KNOW ABOUT RESISTANT STARCH?-

What is Resistant Starch?

Starches are long chains of glucose that are found in grains, potatoes and various foods. But not all of the starch we eat gets digested. Sometimes a small part of it passes through the digestive tract unchanged. In other words, it is resistant to digestion. This type of starch is called resistant starch, which functions kind of like soluble fiber. You will not see spikes in either blood glucose or insulin after eating RS, and do not either obtain significant calories from RS. Once RS reaches the large intestine, bacteria attach to and digest, or ferment, the starch. This is when you receive the benefits of RS. 

Resistant starch selectively stimulates the good bacteria in our intestines, helping to maintain a healthy balance of bacteria. These good bacteria “feed” on RS and produce short chain fatty acids (through fermentation), the most significant of which are acetate, butyrate, and propionate.  Of these three short chain fatty acids (SCFA), butyrate is of particular importance due to its beneficial effects on the colon and overall health, and RS appears to increase butyrate production more when compared with other soluble fibers.

Butyrate is the preferred energy source of the cells lining the colon, and it also plays a number of roles in:

  • increasing metabolism
  • decreasing inflammation
  • improving stress resistance

Click here for 12 others health benefits of consuming RS.

Below are the 4 types of RS and which food found to have RS:

  1. RS Type 1: Starch is physically inaccessible, bound within the fibrous cell walls of plants.  This is found in grains, seeds, and legumes. 

  2. RS Type 2: Starch with a high amylose content, which is indigestible in the raw state.  This is found in potatoes, green (unripe) bananas, and plantains.  Cooking these foods causes changes in the starch making it digestible to us, and removing the resistant starch.

  3. RS Type 3: Also called retrograde RS since this type of RS forms after Type 1 or Type 2 RS is cooked and then cooled.  These cooked and cooled foods can be reheated at low temperatures, less than 130 degrees and maintain the benefits of RS.  Heating at higher temperatures will again convert the starch into a form that is digestible to us rather than “feeding” our gut bacteria.  Examples include cooked and cooled parboiled rice, cooked and cooled potatoes, and cooked and cooled properly prepared (soaked or sprouted) legumes.

  4. RS Type 4: This is a synthetic form of RS that I’m including for completeness, but would not recommend.  A common example is “hi-maize resistant starch.”.

Which Type To Eat and Where Do You Get RS

You can get RS from food. The richest food sources are raw potatoes, green bananas, plantains, cooked-and-cooled potatoes, cooked-and-cooled-rice, parboiled rice, and cooked-and-cooled legumes.

You can also get RS from supplementary isolated starch sources. The best sources are raw potato starch, plantain flour, green banana flour, and cassava/tapioca starch. Raw (not sprouted) mung beans are a good source of RS, so mung bean starch (commonly available in Asian grocers) will probably work, too.

The Most Reliable Way To Get Lots of RS, Fast?

Is with raw potato starch. There are about 8 grams of RS in a tablespoon of the most popular brand: Bob’s Red Mill Unmodified Potato Starch. It’s also available at Whole Foods.

 

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Take RS The Right Way

If you choose to try supplementing with RS, start with small doses of about ¼ teaspoon once daily, and very gradually increase the amount as tolerated.  Some increased gas and bloating is expected as your gut flora changes and adapts, but you do not want to feel uncomfortable.  If you experience marked discomfort, then decrease the amount you’re taking for a few days until your symptoms resolve, and then try increasing again gradually.

Studies indicate that the benefits of resistant starch may be seen when consuming around 15 to 30 grams daily (equivalent to two to four tablespoons of potato starch).  This may be too much for some people to tolerate, particularly in the setting of gut dysbiosis, and going above this amount is not necessarily beneficial.

If you experience marked GI distress with even small amounts of RS, this may be an indication of SIBO (small intestinal bacterial overgrowth) or microbial dysbiosis, and you may need to consider working with a healthcare practitioner to establish a more balanced gut microbiome through the use of herbal antimicrobials and probiotics before adding RS or other prebiotics.

Above is excerpt from Chris Kresser & Mark Sisson blog post.

Butyrate is the preferred energy source of the cells lining the colon. It decreases inflammation in the gut and other tissues.

 

Hence, to sum up, bacteria living in our digestive tracts are dictated by our long-term dietary patterns. Thus, avoidance of sugar, vegetable oils, and lectin-rich grains and legumes to the inclusion of animal fat, protein, resistant starches, and leafy vegetables is a safe way to promote a healthy gut.

LOOKING FOR MORE?

If you want more anti-inflammatory, sustainable energy-generating foods recipes and food topics like this one, or you want to get on track to a healthier eating lifestyle to take any confusion out of the equation, follow my blog!

Remember, Your Energy Matters! –KayChong

 

About: Kay Chong is currently an energy-based food, constant jet-lag recovering & healing food researcher,blogger, healthy eating lifestyle strategist, and a community pharmacist. Kay shares healthy, healing & recovering food recipes, energy boosting food recipes for flight attendants who travel frequently across different time zones and combating with constant jet lag health issues every day. Every recipes that Kay choose, she will make sure that all the ingredients in each and every recipes that are being shared here is the best, healthiest, toxin-free and contain the most healing energy in it. Why? Because Kay believes that the REAL FOOD INGREDIENTS are the most powerful DRUG that can CURE and PREVENT ANY CHRONIC DISEASES on earth!

You can also find Kay on her Twitter, G+, LinkedInFacebookPinterest, and Instagram.

 

Disclaimer: The techniques, strategies, and suggestions expressed here are intended to be used for educational purposes only.The author, Kay Chong is not rendering medical advice, nor to diagnose, prescribe, or treat any disease, condition, illness, or injury. It is imperative that before beginning any nutrition program you receive full medical clearance from a licensed physician. Kay Chong claim no responsibility to any person or entity for any liability, loss, or damage caused or alleged to be caused directly or indirectly as a result of the use, application, or interpretation of the material presented here.

References:

  1. http://coolinginflammation.blogspot.my/.
  2. http://www.marksdailyapple.com/whats-up-with-your-gut-beneficial-bacteria-and-good-digestive-health/#ixzz3oiCrPtfU
  3. http://www.marksdailyapple.com/gut-flora-healthy-immune-system/#axzz3ojdmtWwZ
  4. http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2013/04/22/eating-red-meat.aspx
  5. http://chriskresser.com/how-resistant-starch-will-help-to-make-you-healthier-and-thinner/
  6. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2871118/
  7. http://www.sacfoodcoop.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=438%3Aprobiotics-a-fermented-foods&catid=59%3Aconsumer-guides&lang=us&Itemid=65
  8. http://www.sacfoodcoop.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=438%3Aprobiotics-a-fermented-foods&catid=59%3Aconsumer-guides&lang=us&Itemid=65

How Resistant Starch Will Help to Make You Healthier and Thinner

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I asked Dr. Amy Nett, MD, to contribute this guest post. She recently joined my private practice and will be working with me in the clinic.  Amy initially completed her medical training in radiology at Stanford University Hospital, but wanted to work more directly with patients, helping them to prevent and reverse chronic disease and truly transform their health.  Combined with her passion for nutrition she decided to pursue a career in functional medicine, and is excited to have the opportunity to work more closely with patients in achieving their goals and realizing their best potential.  You’ll be hearing more from Amy in the future!

Over the past several years there has been an exponential increase in the number of studies linking imbalances or disturbances of the gut microbiota to a wide range of diseases including obesity, inflammatory bowel diseases, depression and anxiety (1,2,3,4,5).  One of the best ways to establish and support a healthy gut microbiome is by providing the right “foods” for your gut bacteria.  These “foods” are called prebiotics.

Why you should add resistant starch to your diet.

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Prebiotics are indigestible carbohydrates, or at least indigestible to us, that reach the colon intact and selectively feed many strains of beneficial bacteria.  Prebiotics are generally classified into three different types: non-starch polysaccharides (such as inulin and fructooligosaccharide), soluble fiber (including psyllium husk and acacia fibers), and resistant starch (RS).  Each of these types of prebiotics feeds different species of gut bacteria, but among these, RS is emerging as uniquely beneficial.

The distinctive benefits of RS seem to be unequivocally recognized, even amongstadvocates of a low carbohydrate diet

What is resistant starch?

Resistant starch is a type of starch that is not digested in the stomach or small intestine, reaching the colon intact.  Thus, it “resists” digestion.  This explains why we do not see spikes in either blood glucose or insulin after eating RS, and why we do not obtain significant calories from RS.  

There are four types of resistant starch:

RS Type 1: Starch is physically inaccessible, bound within the fibrous cell walls of plants.  This is found in grains, seeds, and legumes.

RS Type 2: Starch with a high amylose content, which is indigestible in the raw state.  This is found in potatoes, green (unripe) bananas, and plantains.  Cooking these foods causes changes in the starch making it digestible to us, and removing the resistant starch.

RS Type 3: Also called retrograde RS since this type of RS forms after Type 1 or Type 2 RS is cooked and then cooled.  These cooked and cooled foods can be reheated at low temperatures, less than 130 degrees and maintain the benefits of RS (6).  Heating at higher temperatures will again convert the starch into a form that is digestible to us rather than “feeding” our gut bacteria.  Examples include cooked and cooled parboiled rice, cooked and cooled potatoes, and cooked and cooled properly prepared (soaked or sprouted) legumes.

RS Type 4: This is a synthetic form of RS that I’m including for completeness, but would not recommend.  A common example is “hi-maize resistant starch.”

Once RS reaches the large intestine, bacteria attach to and digest, or ferment, the starch.  This is when we receive the benefits of RS.

How resistant starch impacts our health

The normal human gut has hundreds of bacterial species, some good and some not so good.  The overall number and relative quantity of each type has a profound effect on our health and well being.  Resistant starch selectively stimulates the good bacteria in our intestines, helping to maintain a healthy balance of bacteria (7).

These good bacteria “feed” on RS and produce short chain fatty acids (through fermentation), the most significant of which are acetate, butyrate, and propionate.  Of these three short chain fatty acids (SCFA), butyrate is of particular importance due to its beneficial effects on the colon and overall health, and RS appears to increase butyrate production more when compared with other soluble fibers (8).

Butyrate is the preferred energy source of the cells lining the colon, and it also plays a number of roles in increasing metabolism, decreasing inflammation and improving stress resistance, as described in more detail below and previously in thisgreat article by Stephan Guyenet.

Resistant starch helps to lower blood glucose levels and improve insulin sensitivity

Insulin resistance and chronically elevated blood glucose are associated with a host of chronic diseases, including metabolic syndrome.  Several studies have shown that RS may improve insulin sensitivity (9), and decrease blood glucose levels in response to meals (10, 11, 12).  In one study, consumption of 15 and 30 grams per day of resistant starch showed improved insulin sensitivity in overweight and obese men, equivalent to the improvement that would be expected with weight loss equal to approximately 10% of body weight (13).

Further, RS has been shown to exert a “second meal effect.”  This means that not only does RS beneficially decrease the blood glucose response at the time it’s consumed, but, somewhat surprisingly, blood glucose and insulin levels also rise less than would otherwise be expected with the subsequent meal (14).

Why the popular press has touted resistant starch as a “weight loss wonder food”

RS appears to have several beneficial effects that may contribute to weight loss, including decreased blood insulin spikes after meals (as discussed above), decreased appetite, and decreased fat storage in fat cells.  There may also be preservation of lean body mass, though further studies in humans are needed to confirm if there is a significant impact in overall body weight (15).

Further, several studies have shown alterations in the gut microbiome in association with obesity, which subsequently change towards that seen in lean individuals with weight loss (16, 17).  For example, one study demonstrated that the relative composition of the gut microbiota of two predominate beneficial bacteria,Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, varied considerably in association with body composition.  Specifically, obese individuals often have a higher proportion ofFirmicutes to Bacteroidetes, which may be reversed with weight loss, gastric bypass surgery, or treatment with prebiotics (3).  However, not all studies confirm a significant or measurable change in the composition of the microbiome in obese compared to lean individuals, and further studies are needed (18, 19).

Butyrate plays an important role in gut health and decreasing inflammation in the gut and other tissues

As mentioned above, RS intake allows for increased production of butyrate by our gut microbes.  Butyrate acts as a powerful anti-inflammatory agent for the colonic cells, and functions to improve the integrity of our gut by decreasing intestinal permeability and therefore keeping toxins in the gut and out of the bloodstream. (20, 21).  

The SCFAs that aren’t utilized by the colonic cells enter the bloodstream, travel to the liver, and spread throughout the body where they exert additional anti-inflammatory effects.

Resistant starch is also associated with decreased risk of colorectal cancer, thought to occur through several different mechanisms including: protection from DNA damage, favorable changes in gene expression, and increased apoptosis (programmed cell death) of cancerous or pre-cancerous cells (22, 23).

Adding resistant starch to your diet

Some common food sources of RS include green (unripe) bananas, plantains, properly prepared cooked and cooled parboiled rice or legumes, and cooked and cooled potatoes.  See this link for a more complete list of RS quantities in food.

However, if you are on a low carbohydrate diet or don’t tolerate those foods well, you can add RS to your diet without adding digestible carbohydrates.

Bob’s Red Mill Unmodified Potato Starch (NOT potato flour) is one of the best sources of RS with approximately eight grams of RS in one tablespoon.  Potato starch is generally well tolerated even by those who react adversely to nightshades.

Plantain flour and green banana flour are also excellent sources of RS, and there may be benefit to including all three of these sources (specifically alternating your source of RS rather than relying on a single one).

These are relatively bland in flavor and can be added to cold or room temperature water, almond milk, or mixed into smoothies.  But to maintain the benefits of RS, these should not be heated above 130 degrees.

Tim Steele (Tatertot) has written about some of the research on RS supplementation, and in particular the potential further benefit of combining potato starch with psyllium husk fiber to even further increase butyrate production in the colon.

Take it slow

If you choose to try supplementing with RS, start with small doses of about ¼ teaspoon once daily, and very gradually increase the amount as tolerated.  Some increased gas and bloating is expected as your gut flora changes and adapts, but you do not want to feel uncomfortable.  If you experience marked discomfort, then decrease the amount you’re taking for a few days until your symptoms resolve, and then try increasing again gradually.

Studies indicate that the benefits of resistant starch may be seen when consuming around 15 to 30 grams daily (equivalent to two to four tablespoons of potato starch).  This may be too much for some people to tolerate, particularly in the setting of gut dysbiosis, and going above this amount is not necessarily beneficial.

If you experience marked GI distress with even small amounts of RS, this may be an indication of SIBO (small intestinal bacterial overgrowth) or microbial dysbiosis, and you may need to consider working with a healthcare practitioner to establish a more balanced gut microbiome through the use of herbal antimicrobials and probiotics before adding RS or other prebiotics.

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